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中央の列 (POSTS)

2014-08-28

fehyesvintagemanga:

Lemon People magazine


Source: fehyesvintagemanga
Reblogged from lj7stkok ★ Originally posted by fehyesvintagemanga
19 hours ago140 notes#lemon people #magazine cover #art #animanga #manga

2014-08-27

brickme:

Yu Yu Hakusho artbook — Togashi Yoshihiro


Source: brickme
Reblogged from revyl ★ Originally posted by brickme
2 days ago1,430 notes#yu yu hakusho #yyh #manga #art #togashi yoshihiro

2014-08-26



Source: assassinshota
Reblogged from saneininsane ★ Originally posted by assassinshota
3 days ago632 notes#hunter x hunter #manga #gang #hxh

2014-08-12



Source: uiharuuu
Reblogged from 0ci0 ★ Originally posted by uiharuuu
2 weeks ago1,011 notes#one punch man #manga #art #one punch-man

2014-08-12

vintagemanga:

NAGANO Mamoru (永野護 ), The Five Star Stories / Five Star Monogatari / ファイブスター物語

Covers 03


Source: vintagemanga
Reblogged from rowdyimouto ★ Originally posted by vintagemanga
2 weeks ago42 notes#five star monogatari #the five star stories #manga #art #nagano mamoru

2014-08-06

Oooouu, that epic scene with Rebecca and Diamante in the back-drop, it’s like Rosy Utena meets Sunflowery Samurai Champloo


3 weeks ago#One Piece #manga #live blogging

2014-08-04


Source: the-chubby-cheeks-queen
Reblogged from heartisbreaking ★ Originally posted by the-chubby-cheeks-queen
3 weeks ago6,370 notes#naruto #manga #gif

2014-08-02



Source: a-trex
Reblogged from thatguywiththecatpuppet ★ Originally posted by a-trex
3 weeks ago2,018 notes#jojo's bizarre adventure #manga #jjba #jojos bizarre adventure #stardust crusaders

2014-07-23

ZOROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO YASSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS


1 month ago18 notes#ONE PIECE #LIVE BLOGGING #MANGA

2014-07-23

I’ve always thought that Toriko is the shounen manga series that resembles Dragon Ball the most, and the sensu bean cure water introduced in this week’s chapter pretty much confirms it

also, pretty pleased with the way shimabukuro resolved the whole getting torn in half ordeal, less of a cop out than  i would’ve expected from his usual style of writing, the play-on  the Japanese mythology concept of ogres being red an d blue primarily is cool (don’t particularly like the design of the blue one at all, though I’m glad the fight against Heracles is actually coming to legitimate fr uiti on) but the explanation behind Toriko’s blue hair is pretty pointless, because let’s face it, this is beyond fiction, and it’s not like we’re getting an explanation of Sunny’s smorgasbord of colored follicles next 


1 month ago3 notes#toriko #manga #live blogging

2014-07-19



Source: rankyakus
Reblogged from tenkaichibudokai ★ Originally posted by rankyakus
1 month ago281 notes#hunter x hunter #manga #hxh

2014-07-18

ステルス交境曲 #01. その男、透明につき①Stealth Symphony Chapter #01. “About That Man’s Invisibility (Part One)”
Story: Narita Ryohgo (成田 良悟)Art: Amano Youichi (天野 洋一)
There’s something about shounen and the powerhouse publication that is Shueisha’s Weekly Shōnen Jump that beckons even the most adept story-tellers into making a literary and figurative exodus to the adventurous tropes and writing conventions of the genre. Quite surprisingly, this includes Narita Ryohgo, the well-praised light novelist of the series Baccano!, Durarara!!, and more. Through my experiences with Narita’s works, basically comprising of just the two aforementioned, I’ve firmly established my impression of him as being one hell of an introspective writer, well-versed in the ways of character depth, build-up, and interaction. While this is my first time out of his realm of anime-adapted light novel series and into his realm of manga series, it should be noted that this isn’t quite his first time penning a rather boyish series (his Vamp! light novel series has quite the well-endowed fantasy-adventure atmosphere with its premise about rival vampire clans, a vampire princess, and a vampire hunter; and his light novel Bleach: Spirits Are Forever With You is based upon none other than the Weekly Shōnen Jump series that was once a part of the Big 3 ranking.) Going into the first chapter ofStealth Symphony, you can immediately justify its serialization in the magazine; a becoming art-style by illustrator Amano Youichi (original creator of Over Time and former assistant of Hideaki Sorachi, original creator of Gintama) supports the familiar premise of a young boy burdened by a curse that earns him the aggressive scorn of those around him but also grants him a formidable and fate-instilling power.
Synopsis:
Protagonist Jig’s life was jeopardized early on in his childhood because of a severe sickness and the only way to save him was to perform a procedure that attached used cyborg parts to his body. However, the parts were rumored to be a life-support system that a deceased sorcerer had created for himself, in which whenever its wearer’s life was endangered, the support system would repel the attack with twice as much power. The man who promised to take full responsibility for Jig’s operation and life, someone Jig respectfully calls “director”, gave him supplies to travel, money for an exorcism and a good luck charm so that he could venture to Jinbocho, a city of fairy tales where elves, dwarves, lizard men, and countless other mystical species alike gather. It is in this metropolitan of crossed magical paths that Jig should finally be able to find a way to remove his curse. Upon arriving at Jinbocho, Jig’s curse immediately causes him  to have a run in with city officials, so he decides to hire an invisible protection services agent named Yabusame Troma to protect the people of the city from his curse’s unpredictable detonations. From Troma, Jig learns of Jinbocho’s history, primarily about it being a place once run amuck with tyrannical dragons until the hero named Mimerond drove them out and made Jinbocho a free city where people could come from far and wide in search of the magical heirlooms left behind in the dragons’ ruins. Jig and Troma develop a subtle friendship after discussing the nature of Jig’s curse and each others’ dreams (or Troma’s lack thereof), but their bond-forming is interrupted by news of a telekinetic assassin named Kawaharada Jakking who has been hired to kill Jig. Prone to not only physical attacks, Jig’s curse absorbs Jakking’s explosion and fires it back at him. Outmatched, Jakking decides to reveal to Jig the conspiracy behind his current situation, that the good luck charm the director gave Jig was actually a tracking device, that the director hired Jakking to assassinate Jig, that the director was the one who made Jig sick in the first place, and that the life-support system is actually a dragon heirloom that the director used on Jig for experimental purposes. In a bout of madness, Jig activates a new ability from the heirloom, spawning humongous wings out of his back. As Jig is consumed by his madness, Jakking tries to crush Troma between two rock-hard slabs, but the attack is rendered ineffective. In describing Jig’s current state, Troma casually states, “Our young client has lost hope with the world and is trying to destroy it. That’s all it is. There is no need to abandon him or to run away from him.” Troma’s heartfelt words trigger Jig’s self-awareness of his state and his actions; and in desolation, Jig jumps off the building with the intention of ending his own life for good. Jig lands on the ground unscathed because of Troma’s interference, amazingly, and Troma reveals that he is actually not an invisible man, but rather, an invisible dragon.
With the first chapter read and well-re-visited in order to write that summary, I can confidently say that that sure doesn’t feel like the Narita that I know of. By standard shounen standards, I’d say that Stealth Symphony passes all tests; it’s got the common protagonist, it’s got the world lore, it’s set up a prospective and viable battle system through the magic dragon heirlooms (even including a ranking system), it’s teased a miniature skirmish with Jakking, it’s presented a sudden plot twist, it’s paved the way for more story-telling and story-expanding, and hell, it’s even got the rather contemporary gimmick of having an unexplained title (so far, at least). But where it’s really worth, I don’t think Stealth Symphony offers the story-depth and potential as is offered in prior Narita works. Perhaps it was the first three pages of the chapter that had me riled about the focus on Jinbocho as a metropolitan city (because the city setting where a large cast of characters converge might as well be Narita’s story trademark), but the premise fell a bit flat by the read’s end.  It has undoubtedly set up a lively environment of perhaps an even more potentially eclectic cast than the likes of Baccano! and DRR!!, just because the diversity of fantasy species implicitly advances a further degree of varied fun; but as of now, I have a hard timely seeing that advancing past the rather dried-out dialogue, plot-progressions, and character dynamics of shounen convention. All in all, Stealth  Symphony assumes the mantle of the next casual read in the Weekly Shonen Jump roster; and while I can most assuredly seeing getting nothing but better (as is the case with essentially every post-first chapter reading), I think it would a stretch to say that the series will be proving to be of the better works of the shounen genre and or Narita’s bibliography.
Rating: 8.2/10

ステルス交境曲 #01. その男、透明につき①
Stealth Symphony Chapter #01. “About That Man’s Invisibility (Part One)”

Story: Narita Ryohgo (成田 良悟)
Art: Amano Youichi (天野 洋一)

There’s something about shounen and the powerhouse publication that is Shueisha’s Weekly Shōnen Jump that beckons even the most adept story-tellers into making a literary and figurative exodus to the adventurous tropes and writing conventions of the genre. Quite surprisingly, this includes Narita Ryohgo, the well-praised light novelist of the series Baccano!Durarara!!, and more. Through my experiences with Narita’s works, basically comprising of just the two aforementioned, I’ve firmly established my impression of him as being one hell of an introspective writer, well-versed in the ways of character depth, build-up, and interaction. While this is my first time out of his realm of anime-adapted light novel series and into his realm of manga series, it should be noted that this isn’t quite his first time penning a rather boyish series (his Vamp! light novel series has quite the well-endowed fantasy-adventure atmosphere with its premise about rival vampire clans, a vampire princess, and a vampire hunter; and his light novel Bleach: Spirits Are Forever With You is based upon none other than the Weekly Shōnen Jump series that was once a part of the Big 3 ranking.) Going into the first chapter ofStealth Symphony, you can immediately justify its serialization in the magazine; a becoming art-style by illustrator Amano Youichi (original creator of Over Time and former assistant of Hideaki Sorachi, original creator of Gintama) supports the familiar premise of a young boy burdened by a curse that earns him the aggressive scorn of those around him but also grants him a formidable and fate-instilling power.

Synopsis:

Protagonist Jig’s life was jeopardized early on in his childhood because of a severe sickness and the only way to save him was to perform a procedure that attached used cyborg parts to his body. However, the parts were rumored to be a life-support system that a deceased sorcerer had created for himself, in which whenever its wearer’s life was endangered, the support system would repel the attack with twice as much power. The man who promised to take full responsibility for Jig’s operation and life, someone Jig respectfully calls “director”, gave him supplies to travel, money for an exorcism and a good luck charm so that he could venture to Jinbocho, a city of fairy tales where elves, dwarves, lizard men, and countless other mystical species alike gather. It is in this metropolitan of crossed magical paths that Jig should finally be able to find a way to remove his curse. Upon arriving at Jinbocho, Jig’s curse immediately causes him  to have a run in with city officials, so he decides to hire an invisible protection services agent named Yabusame Troma to protect the people of the city from his curse’s unpredictable detonations. From Troma, Jig learns of Jinbocho’s history, primarily about it being a place once run amuck with tyrannical dragons until the hero named Mimerond drove them out and made Jinbocho a free city where people could come from far and wide in search of the magical heirlooms left behind in the dragons’ ruins. Jig and Troma develop a subtle friendship after discussing the nature of Jig’s curse and each others’ dreams (or Troma’s lack thereof), but their bond-forming is interrupted by news of a telekinetic assassin named Kawaharada Jakking who has been hired to kill Jig. Prone to not only physical attacks, Jig’s curse absorbs Jakking’s explosion and fires it back at him. Outmatched, Jakking decides to reveal to Jig the conspiracy behind his current situation, that the good luck charm the director gave Jig was actually a tracking device, that the director hired Jakking to assassinate Jig, that the director was the one who made Jig sick in the first place, and that the life-support system is actually a dragon heirloom that the director used on Jig for experimental purposes. In a bout of madness, Jig activates a new ability from the heirloom, spawning humongous wings out of his back. As Jig is consumed by his madness, Jakking tries to crush Troma between two rock-hard slabs, but the attack is rendered ineffective. In describing Jig’s current state, Troma casually states, “Our young client has lost hope with the world and is trying to destroy it. That’s all it is. There is no need to abandon him or to run away from him.” Troma’s heartfelt words trigger Jig’s self-awareness of his state and his actions; and in desolation, Jig jumps off the building with the intention of ending his own life for good. Jig lands on the ground unscathed because of Troma’s interference, amazingly, and Troma reveals that he is actually not an invisible man, but rather, an invisible dragon.

With the first chapter read and well-re-visited in order to write that summary, I can confidently say that that sure doesn’t feel like the Narita that I know of. By standard shounen standards, I’d say that Stealth Symphony passes all tests; it’s got the common protagonist, it’s got the world lore, it’s set up a prospective and viable battle system through the magic dragon heirlooms (even including a ranking system), it’s teased a miniature skirmish with Jakking, it’s presented a sudden plot twist, it’s paved the way for more story-telling and story-expanding, and hell, it’s even got the rather contemporary gimmick of having an unexplained title (so far, at least). But where it’s really worth, I don’t think Stealth Symphony offers the story-depth and potential as is offered in prior Narita works. Perhaps it was the first three pages of the chapter that had me riled about the focus on Jinbocho as a metropolitan city (because the city setting where a large cast of characters converge might as well be Narita’s story trademark), but the premise fell a bit flat by the read’s end.  It has undoubtedly set up a lively environment of perhaps an even more potentially eclectic cast than the likes of Baccano! and DRR!!, just because the diversity of fantasy species implicitly advances a further degree of varied fun; but as of now, I have a hard timely seeing that advancing past the rather dried-out dialogue, plot-progressions, and character dynamics of shounen convention. All in all, Stealth  Symphony assumes the mantle of the next casual read in the Weekly Shonen Jump roster; and while I can most assuredly seeing getting nothing but better (as is the case with essentially every post-first chapter reading), I think it would a stretch to say that the series will be proving to be of the better works of the shounen genre and or Narita’s bibliography.

Rating: 8.2/10


Source: l3reezer.becauseofdreams.com
1 month ago4 notes#hey ho first ever manga review #trying to make this a thing while getting back into the medium #please do check out the site and support~ #stealth symphony #manga #ステルス交境 #Narita Ryohgo #review #long post

2014-07-03



Source: unresponsive
Reblogged from estheim ★ Originally posted by unresponsive
1 month ago4,514 notes#omfg #hxh #hunter x hunter #manga

2014-06-25

TORIKO NEEDS A LEGITIMATE ANIME ADAPTATION

IT’S ONE OF THE SHONEN SERIES THAT IS STILL GETTING BETTER WITH TIME


2 months ago11 notes#toriko #anime #manga

2014-06-17



Source: coalgirls
Reblogged from dressrosas ★ Originally posted by coalgirls
2 months ago725 notes#hunter x hunter #hxh #anime #manga
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