A.K.A. Buy my shit because I'm poor and still need to deplete this first batch that I spent hundreds of my own dollars on!!

中央の列

2014-04-24

  • What are your thoughts now on No Game No Life and Hitsugi no Chaika now that we're 3 episodes in?

    Anonymous


    No Game No Life’s entertainment value has kind of dropped for me now that they’ve shown what the feel of the games will be like. Not too impressed with the tactics and strategy behind Team Blank’s victories (it might’ve been a mistake to paint them so unparalleled from the start, but gotta watch a little more to see if things actually get challenging for them) and the comical comebacks they make don’t quite justify it all in the long run. I was kind of disappointed that Stephanie sunk into the ditzy, damsel in distress archetype too.

    Hitsugi no Chaika is still as ambiguous as to what direction it’s heading in as it was in episode one, but I’m finding myself enjoying it enough. I think it has the air of what a good adaptation of a fantasy, Western-influenced JRPG would be like. Feel like the story could get a lot better but having 12 episodes only scheduled throws me off. The characters and visual production so far are good enough to make me watch all the way though.


    6 hours ago1 note#responses #anime #Anonymous

    2014-04-23

    oh boy, I could’ve done the last two papers for this term in less time and words than that review

    I REGRET NOTHING  I REGRET NOTHING I REGRET NOTHING I REGRET NOTHING I REGRET NOTHING I REGRET NOTHING I REGRET NOTHING  FUCK SCHOOL HUNTER X HUNTER BIYATCCCHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH


    2 days ago3 notes#personal #anime

    2014-04-23

    Hunter x Hunter #126. 

「ゼロ × ト × ローズ」 (Zero × to × Rōzu)
 Zero and Rose
Today’s post is brought to you by the letter H. Well, actually, make that two. For those of you who haven’t heard, the long-awaited return of the Hunter x Hunter manga series to Weekly Shounen Jump‘s serialization has finally been announced, due this June. Alongside this announcement, two years in the waiting, was the most recent episode of the 2011 anime adaptation. Given the immensity of such news and the perfection of the episode, we’re all good to put H and H together and proclaim 2014 as the year of Hunter x Hunter.
Other than rejoicing in the fact that this episode very well may be the end to widespread complaints about the arc’s gradual pacing and lack of action, I really don’t know where to begin in reacting to this episode. Wholly speaking, this episode is nothing other than pure artistry, a paradigm of first-rate anime, in visual quality, in aesthetic style, in cinematic direction, in soundtrack, in voicework (I say this while still bereaving at the loss of Nagai Ichirou as Netero’s original seiyuu), and more, all individually and jointly operating at high-caliber performance. I might as well hyperlink every sentence of this article to an individual screen-cap because each one will be more than enough to convey the sterling standard of quality Madhouse has celestially decreed for this episode. The variant art-styles ranging from classic dynamic-action sequences, Ukiyo-e-esque caricatures, surprisingly fulfilling CGI, a hyper-line-art style I can only really describe as resemblant to fellow WSJ series Toriko, design-savy graphics most familiar from the Komugi-centric episodes, and last but not least the signature style of this 2011 adaptation that has done nothing but grace us with its elegance. Portraits of such fine detail they could very much be printed and used as high-quality promotional posters but instead simply serve as split seconds in a twenty minute episode. Commendable dedication by all means.
The episode continues directly where it left off last week, with Netero throwing Meruem a heart-shaped hand gesture in preparation for his next attack. I have no doubt in my mind that a lot of people must have thought the gesture itself emanated a completely off-feeling, considering the tense and solemn air that had been established prior. I myself thought it was obviously silly, but in the approving sense that it only made Netero all the more bad-ass for not assimilating into his strongest character trope too much and embracing a unique personality, something that evokes pressing significance soon enough. In any case, for those who did have ill feelings toward this man’s indiscriminate love, thinking it would obstruct from a fearsome presence and or a funereal atmosphere in the ensuing battle, they were dead wrong. As far as battles go, this was beyond doubt one between elites, evident enough by the most intense, high-flying action we’ve so far,  the overall duration and entire episode commitment, and the unleashed animation budget.
In the midst of battle, the King can only re-verify the words of approbation he had directed towards Netero before the fight began, as he continues to operate under the pretense of need not killing him to break his will. It’s an entirely risky approach towards dealing with humanity’s greatest warrior, especially when said opponent is already pushing you to your limits from the start of the battle. But this isn’t poor battle tendency on the King’s behalf, rather, the effect of his mental and psychological framework that denies falsity of his own omnipotence. Since his birth, the King’s every moment of fascination and enthrallment has been towards humans in which they revealed their potential for infinite progress. To an extent, he had witnessed this with Komugi during their numberous games of Gungi, even if only briefly.  It’s a bit hard to say that the King ever did rival Komugi enough to force her to become a better player; at the same time, it’s worth speculation as to whether or not he could have done so had a team of trained combatants not come for his head. While the King was never able to see Komugi surpass her own Gungi skills, what she had affected him with, to his outright astonishment, was her emotional unpredictability. At the time, his sentimental relationship with Komugi had overtly confounded him, but an epiphany besides a board game doesn’t promptly call for necessary action as a life-or-death fight does. Now against Netero, the King fights an extension of the battle on the Gungi board,  even at one point recalling himself how his matches against Komugi educated him in the art of anticipating enemy actions. Whether he can grasp the conceptuality behind his own words or not, he essentially acknowledges not only growth from a human’s influence but human-like growth from social interchanges. (Considering how many humans he has come face to face with, dependent on the number of national champions he played against, a good percentage of them have been life-altering influences, even if that percentage consists of only Komugi and Netero.) As he invokes this emotional response of admiration over and over again, now with Netero, one when he realizes it must have taken Netero anywhere between five to ten years of unhindered training to attain his physical and spiritual capacity, two when he recognizes Netero’s mental and physiological fortitude in recuperating from a dismembered limb, three when he marvels the strength of Netero’s one-handed prayer, and four when he succumbs victim to Netero’s final act, four incidents too many he takes to finally realize that Netero may humanity’s strongest warrior, but he is not its strongest weapon.
To the extent that they could show Netero in his already withered, limbless form, naked, yet still have him (arguably) be the most frightening thing this series has portrayed, that’s especially saying something after this arc’s fear-mongering history of overwhelming character presences and the eye widening, profuse sweating, pants-soiling, hair losing, psyche damaging, and outright dying that comes along with them. It’s an utterly symbolic depiction, to have one’s wholeness exposed and nonetheless have such fearlessness and intimidation. This also all coming from an old man, arguably the most amiable and sincere character in the series, who wears a heart beyond his sleeve on his chest, and who has implemented his boundless and indiscriminate love into his own fighting style. The two infinities of humankind, love and progress. I don’t suspect that anyone conditioned to the workings of anime perceived the tight-clothes wearing, heart-gesturing, old-even-amongst-the-old, Netero as one bit creepy as they would if they saw such a figure in real life, but now there’s no way for anyone to not. The blaring sound of death, the depraving pitch blackness of his eyes, the protruding aura of decay, the eerie and shrill tone of his voice invoking condemnation… It’s hard to judge whether this is an over-stylization specifically for the King or not, because I certainly cannot imagine Netero donning such expressions and forcing such haunting words upon anyone, or anything, other than the King, nor can I really imagine him losing to anything other than this overwhelming monstrosity who has been gradually and thoroughly established as such in the past 50 episodes. It hints at nihilistic type of story-writing, really, a fate so appropriate and conceptually fitting for our chairman that his avoidable destiny be none other than death before this particular adversary.  Granted, death, but a loss of life that doesn’t quite translate into a loss in battle. Even if the King manages to survive Netero’s Miniature Rose detonation (which I’m willing to bet on myself), in no way does the tone of the ending moments favor it as the King’s victory. Never before has the question of between Chimera Ants and humans, which race is the actual monster here come to such light. As our resiliently-toned narrator (seriously, give this guy an award for composure under the most thrilling of happenings) says, as Meruem himself is speechless, it was the first time the King had felt fear, an emotional confession that much more significant because of its juxtaposition right after Meruem’s own kingly speech about the Chimera Ants’ own elucidation of regality, predestination, and the natural order of the world. His proposition of a new world order is dismantled by one man’s will, and it’s a complete kick in the royal ass, really.
If the incarnation of death really does meet a man upon his death to take him, just what kind of monster is Netero to apportion the touch of death onto another living being to traverse the depths of hell along with him? Netero’s finals words, “If there is a hell, we’ll meet again there,” are enough to dish out an array of inquisitions. As a human, has he committed enough sin in his 110 years of life to be deemed hell-bound, or is it the deal with the devil taking both their lives that is considered his sinful act? Just how conflicted is Netero in actually fighting Meruem that before the physical confrontation began, he resolved to kill the King before he could sympathize with him anymore and by the time of his suicidal resort, he has completely convinced himself Meruem to be a monster born of inherent sin? Transient and fleeting thoughts. Alongside this zenith of battles, the long established side-narrative of the King’s birth-name finally culminates with him finally hearing it himself. And I swear to God, or Death, or whoever, that it couldn’t have been more terrifyingly delivered than beckoned by a ghastly Netero as an mortifying curse. And conceptually so, as we retrace the fates of our Chimera Ant cast, most of them face this search for self-identity, meeting their deaths in pursuit of it, whether of their own volition or not. For Meruem, a child born into the world without completing his nativity with a nominal selfdom, he has up to this point in time and life merely pinned his intrigue on the latency of human beings, continually being bespectacled by their sheer individuality and personality (a form of expression that enabled his upper-hand upon Netero) to the point of lusting over his own. Here before Netero, who might as well be considered his deliverer into life, he is officially born for the first time and meets his timely demise immediately after. It flaunts beautiful conceptual symmetry, but I’m inclined to think that this is only the penultimate realization his character is to experience before welcoming death and by effect that he shouldn’t be written off (literally) just yet. It may be because of the sheer amount of times Meruem survived Netero’s “next big shot” in this episode alone, but it isn’t easy to believe the conflict ending right then and there. A king does not simply die before his royal guard. Though at the same time, it may be even harder to believe that any person and or persons could prove to be anywhere near as formidable to the King as Netero was. Perhaps with the sole exception of our half-eponymous Ging, but he is a man who already eludes the main story itself, let alone a single arc. That of course leaves this catastrophe in the young, abled(?) hands of our main characters. There are many a times when one can forget that Hunter x Hunter is in fact a predominantly youth-targeted shounen series; this arc speaks volumes (literally) for that effect. And if this really is the point where we delve into the core of the arc’s story, centric on our protagonists (though Hunter x Hunter has never been one to conform to the main cast format, says Leorio, two inaudible arcs away), it has been nothing but a beautiful and glorious set-up. The responsibility and the fate of the free world has been passed on to the new generation (this trope being a particularly beloved of mine), but the celebratory and hopeful sensitivities usually associated with this redemption are nowhere to be found. From the start, Hunter x Hunter has made it a point to not portray this story of species decimation as a happy-go-lucky adventure that our characters could ever recover from psychologically, both young and old alike. This fact was carved into stone before the Chimera Ants even evolved into their current threatening state. In speaking of the infinite potential of humanity, boundless evolution, and Netero’s legacy being passed down to our protagonists, I can’t help but comment on his specific manner of death, a suicide bombing. Perhaps another main reason behind my skepticism in Muruem’s demise is the fact that Minature Rose is not a Nen-powered ability but instead a technologically mass-produced and mass-destructive weapon, a construction that would pass in any universe other than the one Togashi has developed  wherein Nen-users rule supreme and even amongst the most trained f these Nen-users alike, one moment without a repelling Nen force can mean instant death. The intricacies of Nen and how it is influenced by the individual’s personality have unquestionably allowed for the creative progression of this story thus far, but Meruem’s description of Netero as the pinnacle of individual strength and the supposed inferiority of the ultimate Nen-user to the endlessly advancing apparatus of mechanized warfare begs another slew of intense and far-reaching questions. How does the aura of Nen intersect with the natural resources of the world being manipulated into weaponry? Could Meruem have been defeated by normal humans and modern technology? Even the subtle inclusions like the indirect reference to a certain dictatorial country begins to show conceptual correlation. If humanity’s potential surely is infinite, then what we’ve seen here today is that its potential equally stretches both arms to both the good and the evil ends of the spectrum. Debasing Netero’s character is the last thing I want to do with all these reflections however. So, with all said and done and all profundity considered, I’d like to end on a simple note and re-iteration. Power levels have been a strong point of contention within the Hunter x Hunter universe ever since Togashi radically decided to make the Phantom Troupe, a collective still to this day considered amongst the strongest characters of the series, the main antagonists of one of the earliest arcs of the series. Such dispute has only intensified with the continual appearance of characters like Hisoka and Killua’s ancestors. Despite this, I believe it’s fair to say that Isaac Netero is a frontrunner, in individual strength and status. And while this episode has made our final judgment easier in a sense by seeing to his demise, it has also shadowed the topic as obsolete. Alongside the eminence of his character was a true display of the anime art-form at its greatest , so in showing my appreciation, I can only quote the two children he has left his trust behind in, thank you Chairman Netero.

    Hunter x Hunter #126.

    「ゼロ × ト × ローズ」 (Zero × to × Rōzu)

    Zero and Rose

    Today’s post is brought to you by the letter H. Well, actually, make that two. For those of you who haven’t heard, the long-awaited return of the Hunter x Hunter manga series to Weekly Shounen Jump‘s serialization has finally been announced, due this June. Alongside this announcement, two years in the waiting, was the most recent episode of the 2011 anime adaptation. Given the immensity of such news and the perfection of the episode, we’re all good to put H and H together and proclaim 2014 as the year of Hunter x Hunter.

    Other than rejoicing in the fact that this episode very well may be the end to widespread complaints about the arc’s gradual pacing and lack of action, I really don’t know where to begin in reacting to this episode. Wholly speaking, this episode is nothing other than pure artistry, a paradigm of first-rate anime, in visual quality, in aesthetic style, in cinematic direction, in soundtrack, in voicework (I say this while still bereaving at the loss of Nagai Ichirou as Netero’s original seiyuu), and more, all individually and jointly operating at high-caliber performance. I might as well hyperlink every sentence of this article to an individual screen-cap because each one will be more than enough to convey the sterling standard of quality Madhouse has celestially decreed for this episode. The variant art-styles ranging from classic dynamic-action sequences, Ukiyo-e-esque caricatures, surprisingly fulfilling CGI, a hyper-line-art style I can only really describe as resemblant to fellow WSJ series Toriko, design-savy graphics most familiar from the Komugi-centric episodes, and last but not least the signature style of this 2011 adaptation that has done nothing but grace us with its elegance. Portraits of such fine detail they could very much be printed and used as high-quality promotional posters but instead simply serve as split seconds in a twenty minute episode. Commendable dedication by all means.

    The episode continues directly where it left off last week, with Netero throwing Meruem a heart-shaped hand gesture in preparation for his next attack. I have no doubt in my mind that a lot of people must have thought the gesture itself emanated a completely off-feeling, considering the tense and solemn air that had been established prior. I myself thought it was obviously silly, but in the approving sense that it only made Netero all the more bad-ass for not assimilating into his strongest character trope too much and embracing a unique personality, something that evokes pressing significance soon enough. In any case, for those who did have ill feelings toward this man’s indiscriminate love, thinking it would obstruct from a fearsome presence and or a funereal atmosphere in the ensuing battle, they were dead wrong. As far as battles go, this was beyond doubt one between elites, evident enough by the most intense, high-flying action we’ve so far,  the overall duration and entire episode commitment, and the unleashed animation budget.

    In the midst of battle, the King can only re-verify the words of approbation he had directed towards Netero before the fight began, as he continues to operate under the pretense of need not killing him to break his will. It’s an entirely risky approach towards dealing with humanity’s greatest warrior, especially when said opponent is already pushing you to your limits from the start of the battle. But this isn’t poor battle tendency on the King’s behalf, rather, the effect of his mental and psychological framework that denies falsity of his own omnipotence. Since his birth, the King’s every moment of fascination and enthrallment has been towards humans in which they revealed their potential for infinite progress. To an extent, he had witnessed this with Komugi during their numberous games of Gungi, even if only briefly.  It’s a bit hard to say that the King ever did rival Komugi enough to force her to become a better player; at the same time, it’s worth speculation as to whether or not he could have done so had a team of trained combatants not come for his head. While the King was never able to see Komugi surpass her own Gungi skills, what she had affected him with, to his outright astonishment, was her emotional unpredictability. At the time, his sentimental relationship with Komugi had overtly confounded him, but an epiphany besides a board game doesn’t promptly call for necessary action as a life-or-death fight does. Now against Netero, the King fights an extension of the battle on the Gungi board,  even at one point recalling himself how his matches against Komugi educated him in the art of anticipating enemy actions. Whether he can grasp the conceptuality behind his own words or not, he essentially acknowledges not only growth from a human’s influence but human-like growth from social interchanges. (Considering how many humans he has come face to face with, dependent on the number of national champions he played against, a good percentage of them have been life-altering influences, even if that percentage consists of only Komugi and Netero.) As he invokes this emotional response of admiration over and over again, now with Netero, one when he realizes it must have taken Netero anywhere between five to ten years of unhindered training to attain his physical and spiritual capacity, two when he recognizes Netero’s mental and physiological fortitude in recuperating from a dismembered limb, three when he marvels the strength of Netero’s one-handed prayer, and four when he succumbs victim to Netero’s final act, four incidents too many he takes to finally realize that Netero may humanity’s strongest warrior, but he is not its strongest weapon.

    To the extent that they could show Netero in his already withered, limbless form, naked, yet still have him (arguably) be the most frightening thing this series has portrayed, that’s especially saying something after this arc’s fear-mongering history of overwhelming character presences and the eye widening, profuse sweating, pants-soiling, hair losing, psyche damaging, and outright dying that comes along with them. It’s an utterly symbolic depiction, to have one’s wholeness exposed and nonetheless have such fearlessness and intimidation. This also all coming from an old man, arguably the most amiable and sincere character in the series, who wears a heart beyond his sleeve on his chest, and who has implemented his boundless and indiscriminate love into his own fighting style. The two infinities of humankind, love and progress. I don’t suspect that anyone conditioned to the workings of anime perceived the tight-clothes wearing, heart-gesturing, old-even-amongst-the-old, Netero as one bit creepy as they would if they saw such a figure in real life, but now there’s no way for anyone to not. The blaring sound of death, the depraving pitch blackness of his eyes, the protruding aura of decay, the eerie and shrill tone of his voice invoking condemnation… It’s hard to judge whether this is an over-stylization specifically for the King or not, because I certainly cannot imagine Netero donning such expressions and forcing such haunting words upon anyone, or anything, other than the King, nor can I really imagine him losing to anything other than this overwhelming monstrosity who has been gradually and thoroughly established as such in the past 50 episodes. It hints at nihilistic type of story-writing, really, a fate so appropriate and conceptually fitting for our chairman that his avoidable destiny be none other than death before this particular adversary.  Granted, death, but a loss of life that doesn’t quite translate into a loss in battle. Even if the King manages to survive Netero’s Miniature Rose detonation (which I’m willing to bet on myself), in no way does the tone of the ending moments favor it as the King’s victory. Never before has the question of between Chimera Ants and humans, which race is the actual monster here come to such light. As our resiliently-toned narrator (seriously, give this guy an award for composure under the most thrilling of happenings) says, as Meruem himself is speechless, it was the first time the King had felt fear, an emotional confession that much more significant because of its juxtaposition right after Meruem’s own kingly speech about the Chimera Ants’ own elucidation of regality, predestination, and the natural order of the world. His proposition of a new world order is dismantled by one man’s will, and it’s a complete kick in the royal ass, really.

    If the incarnation of death really does meet a man upon his death to take him, just what kind of monster is Netero to apportion the touch of death onto another living being to traverse the depths of hell along with him? Netero’s finals words, “If there is a hell, we’ll meet again there,” are enough to dish out an array of inquisitions. As a human, has he committed enough sin in his 110 years of life to be deemed hell-bound, or is it the deal with the devil taking both their lives that is considered his sinful act? Just how conflicted is Netero in actually fighting Meruem that before the physical confrontation began, he resolved to kill the King before he could sympathize with him anymore and by the time of his suicidal resort, he has completely convinced himself Meruem to be a monster born of inherent sin? Transient and fleeting thoughts. Alongside this zenith of battles, the long established side-narrative of the King’s birth-name finally culminates with him finally hearing it himself. And I swear to God, or Death, or whoever, that it couldn’t have been more terrifyingly delivered than beckoned by a ghastly Netero as an mortifying curse. And conceptually so, as we retrace the fates of our Chimera Ant cast, most of them face this search for self-identity, meeting their deaths in pursuit of it, whether of their own volition or not. For Meruem, a child born into the world without completing his nativity with a nominal selfdom, he has up to this point in time and life merely pinned his intrigue on the latency of human beings, continually being bespectacled by their sheer individuality and personality (a form of expression that enabled his upper-hand upon Netero) to the point of lusting over his own. Here before Netero, who might as well be considered his deliverer into life, he is officially born for the first time and meets his timely demise immediately after. It flaunts beautiful conceptual symmetry, but I’m inclined to think that this is only the penultimate realization his character is to experience before welcoming death and by effect that he shouldn’t be written off (literally) just yet. It may be because of the sheer amount of times Meruem survived Netero’s “next big shot” in this episode alone, but it isn’t easy to believe the conflict ending right then and there. A king does not simply die before his royal guard. Though at the same time, it may be even harder to believe that any person and or persons could prove to be anywhere near as formidable to the King as Netero was. Perhaps with the sole exception of our half-eponymous Ging, but he is a man who already eludes the main story itself, let alone a single arc. That of course leaves this catastrophe in the young, abled(?) hands of our main characters. There are many a times when one can forget that Hunter x Hunter is in fact a predominantly youth-targeted shounen series; this arc speaks volumes (literally) for that effect. And if this really is the point where we delve into the core of the arc’s story, centric on our protagonists (though Hunter x Hunter has never been one to conform to the main cast format, says Leorio, two inaudible arcs away), it has been nothing but a beautiful and glorious set-up. The responsibility and the fate of the free world has been passed on to the new generation (this trope being a particularly beloved of mine), but the celebratory and hopeful sensitivities usually associated with this redemption are nowhere to be found. From the start, Hunter x Hunter has made it a point to not portray this story of species decimation as a happy-go-lucky adventure that our characters could ever recover from psychologically, both young and old alike. This fact was carved into stone before the Chimera Ants even evolved into their current threatening state. In speaking of the infinite potential of humanity, boundless evolution, and Netero’s legacy being passed down to our protagonists, I can’t help but comment on his specific manner of death, a suicide bombing. Perhaps another main reason behind my skepticism in Muruem’s demise is the fact that Minature Rose is not a Nen-powered ability but instead a technologically mass-produced and mass-destructive weapon, a construction that would pass in any universe other than the one Togashi has developed  wherein Nen-users rule supreme and even amongst the most trained f these Nen-users alike, one moment without a repelling Nen force can mean instant death. The intricacies of Nen and how it is influenced by the individual’s personality have unquestionably allowed for the creative progression of this story thus far, but Meruem’s description of Netero as the pinnacle of individual strength and the supposed inferiority of the ultimate Nen-user to the endlessly advancing apparatus of mechanized warfare begs another slew of intense and far-reaching questions. How does the aura of Nen intersect with the natural resources of the world being manipulated into weaponry? Could Meruem have been defeated by normal humans and modern technology? Even the subtle inclusions like the indirect reference to a certain dictatorial country begins to show conceptual correlation. If humanity’s potential surely is infinite, then what we’ve seen here today is that its potential equally stretches both arms to both the good and the evil ends of the spectrum. Debasing Netero’s character is the last thing I want to do with all these reflections however. So, with all said and done and all profundity considered, I’d like to end on a simple note and re-iteration. Power levels have been a strong point of contention within the Hunter x Hunter universe ever since Togashi radically decided to make the Phantom Troupe, a collective still to this day considered amongst the strongest characters of the series, the main antagonists of one of the earliest arcs of the series. Such dispute has only intensified with the continual appearance of characters like Hisoka and Killua’s ancestors. Despite this, I believe it’s fair to say that Isaac Netero is a frontrunner, in individual strength and status. And while this episode has made our final judgment easier in a sense by seeing to his demise, it has also shadowed the topic as obsolete. Alongside the eminence of his character was a true display of the anime art-form at its greatest , so in showing my appreciation, I can only quote the two children he has left his trust behind in, thank you Chairman Netero.


    Source: l3reezer.becauseofdreams.com
    2 days ago21 notes#Hunter x Hunter #hxh #anime #review

    2014-04-22

    nothing other than pure artistry, that episode , visual quality, art style, soundtrack, direction, mthbrmhrtmgrtgbrtgbrtgrtgrtfewfvrbnggg


    2 days ago6 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    Reblogged from l4reezer ★ Originally posted by l4reezer
    2 days ago8 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    Reblogged from l4reezer ★ Originally posted by l4reezer
    2 days ago10 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    Reblogged from l4reezer ★ Originally posted by l4reezer
    2 days ago7 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    Reblogged from l4reezer ★ Originally posted by l4reezer
    2 days ago9 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    Reblogged from l4reezer ★ Originally posted by l4reezer
    2 days ago8 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    2 days ago2 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    2 days ago8 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    2 days ago6 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    2 days ago1 note#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    2 days ago1 note#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime

    2014-04-22


    2 days ago7 notes#HUNTER X HUNTER #hxh #anime
  • 左の列


    (≚ᄌ≚)ℒℴѵℯ❤