a march of dream drifty musica

中央の列 (POSTS)

2014-10-01


Source: pixeldrako
Reblogged from kpdanny ★ Originally posted by pixeldrako
1 hour ago528 notes#gurren lagann #tenga toppa gurren lagann #ttgl #anime #gif

2014-10-01



Source: killuafreecss
Reblogged from shakingtheworld ★ Originally posted by killuafreecss
12 hours ago536 notes#hunter x hunter #hxh #anime #gif

2014-09-30



Reblogged from kininaruarekore ★ Originally posted by kininaruarekore
1 day ago377 notes#gj-bu #gj bu #anime #gif

2014-09-30

I've been possessed by an evil spirit.


Source: josugei
Reblogged from killuazoldicks ★ Originally posted by josugei
1 day ago252 notes#stardust crusaders #jjba #anime #gif #jojos bizarre adventure #jojo's bizarre adventure

2014-09-29


RE: HAMATORA #12. 「RE:RESOLUTION[EGO]」 (END) – HOLDING ON TO THE POTENTIAL FOR TOP 10 ANIME OF THE YEAR UNTIL THE VERY END
Re:␣ハマトラ 第1話 「Re:Resolution[EGO]Re: Hamatora #01. 「Re:Resolution[EGO]」
I’ve been following the Hamatora project since the first season’s airing from January to March, and boy, has it been quite the emotional thrill ride. Back then, I definitely viewed the series through the lens of a pretty well-established crime-solving and mystery series, but this second cour has definitely broadened the series’s genre palette some more.
I’ve said through live-blogging various episodes that Hamatora is a show that definitely has the potential to be a part of the top ten anime series of the year (a potential that has officially been truncated with this final episode); its story structure rivals just about every standard ongoing long-running shounen series today and it can definitely boast some more shocking plot twists and turns along the way. The cast of characters is condensed enough just to imbue every protagonist with a genuine touch of personality alongside their alleged archetypes, and the over-arching premise of Minimum abilities is an acceptable basis for combative face-offs alongside, again, familiar tropes in characters and story-telling, such as the self-conscious loner with no powers of his own (until he dies and is resurrected that is) or the one with the out-reaching power of amplifying or nullifying all others’ abilities who is ultimately used in the hair-brained scheme of the antagonist (Misfits THE ANIMATION, anyone?). In the midst of all convention, Hamatoraexecutes many points quite finely; but at the same time, in this article I mean to cover what I consider the show’s greatest misstep: its points of focus. Its apparent budget allocated to animation is another heavy point of disapproval, but not quite as influential in this case (the impression you get from the show’s presentation itself is something along the lines of very admirable given the apparent budget in fact; they pull off some improvised texture usage and animation techniques such as the blood splatters to satisfaction – though that’s not to say that with enough money thrown into the piggy-bank, this show still could not have forced its way into the top ten of the year, because production values can go a very, very long way).
In both episode-by-episode direction and atmosphere, Hamatora has touched on all kinds of styles. When the over-arching narrative of best-friends-come-sworn-enemies isn’t at the forefront of attention, we’re faced with crime-of-the-week episodes; what could be construed as the anime equivalent of bottle episodes based on the misadventures in a hospital building or a theatrical contest to seize the role for a play; and more. It’s undeniably all over the place, but the thing is that it does each aspect pretty darn well and that the show wouldn’t have shown so much promise if it didn’t transcend the weekly mystery-solving antics of season one; in the end it’s only really at fault in how it organizes these segments. One particular scene I’d like to do a subtle close-reading of is the interaction between Ratio and Birthday at the end of the ninth episode in which Birthday quite literally starts spewing blood out of his mouth and all but falls out of commission; it’s as if the whole twenty minutes preluding the scene (pretty much the entire episode) was meant to emphasize the gravity of this situation by means of its own contrasting light-hearted debauchery with the rest of the rascals of Café Nowhere. This juxtaposition is of course one of the key examples of the show’s promise that is apparently only eligible subsequent to a rather questionable direction of focus. In contrast to this scene is the brawl scene at the end of the third episode, 「Madness Flower」; in what is quite possibly the most shounen moment of the year,  Nice is saved from Art’s final blow by first, Murasaki, second, Birthday, and third, Ratio, all of whom get their respective attacks dished out on Art, to much satisfaction (as some bonus parallel points, the street-fight setting is highly reminiscent of the recently concluded Yozakura Quartet: Hana no Uta.) It’s a celebratory occasion of the purest shounen nature, and I was even sitting on the edge of my seat questioning why the same fate couldn’t be bestowed upon another certain resemblant character of another certain resemblant series (boy, that would be a lot of attacks from a lot of characters). And for the most part, that scene in particular has its own standalone impact; it’s the concluding scene to an episode that is wholly focused on the prime narrative, and that overall structure delivers well. Such is not always the occasion for the series though, as when the show is especially centered on its grand narrative, the script introduces a lot of bases, though, again, it doesn’t quite fully cover them; so it’s not entirely shocking when antagonists are finally dealt with in the span of seconds in the form of a self-inflicted gunshot to the head in the last episode.
All in all, for a story of its caliber, Hamatora definitely incites some thrilling plot elements and plays off of the shock-factor well. To that extent, as aforementioned, it can hold its own against the run-of-the-mill shounen series; but while the shounen genre is undeniably the powerhouse of the anime (and manga)  industry, the medium itself is vast, brimming with both variety and potential, and ultimately transcendent of the peak of Hamatora‘s execution. Well, when it comes to judging the best of the best on a yearly basis, at least. By any other criteria, I can comfortably say, “Good show Hamatora, good show.”

RE: HAMATORA #12. 「RE:RESOLUTION[EGO]」 (END) – HOLDING ON TO THE POTENTIAL FOR TOP 10 ANIME OF THE YEAR UNTIL THE VERY END

Re:␣ハマトラ 第1話 「Re:Resolution[EGO]
Re: Hamatora #01. 「Re:Resolution[EGO]」

I’ve been following the Hamatora project since the first season’s airing from January to March, and boy, has it been quite the emotional thrill ride. Back then, I definitely viewed the series through the lens of a pretty well-established crime-solving and mystery series, but this second cour has definitely broadened the series’s genre palette some more.

I’ve said through live-blogging various episodes that Hamatora is a show that definitely has the potential to be a part of the top ten anime series of the year (a potential that has officially been truncated with this final episode); its story structure rivals just about every standard ongoing long-running shounen series today and it can definitely boast some more shocking plot twists and turns along the way. The cast of characters is condensed enough just to imbue every protagonist with a genuine touch of personality alongside their alleged archetypes, and the over-arching premise of Minimum abilities is an acceptable basis for combative face-offs alongside, again, familiar tropes in characters and story-telling, such as the self-conscious loner with no powers of his own (until he dies and is resurrected that is) or the one with the out-reaching power of amplifying or nullifying all others’ abilities who is ultimately used in the hair-brained scheme of the antagonist (Misfits THE ANIMATION, anyone?). In the midst of all convention, Hamatoraexecutes many points quite finely; but at the same time, in this article I mean to cover what I consider the show’s greatest misstep: its points of focus. Its apparent budget allocated to animation is another heavy point of disapproval, but not quite as influential in this case (the impression you get from the show’s presentation itself is something along the lines of very admirable given the apparent budget in fact; they pull off some improvised texture usage and animation techniques such as the blood splatters to satisfaction – though that’s not to say that with enough money thrown into the piggy-bank, this show still could not have forced its way into the top ten of the year, because production values can go a very, very long way).

In both episode-by-episode direction and atmosphere, Hamatora has touched on all kinds of styles. When the over-arching narrative of best-friends-come-sworn-enemies isn’t at the forefront of attention, we’re faced with crime-of-the-week episodes; what could be construed as the anime equivalent of bottle episodes based on the misadventures in a hospital building or a theatrical contest to seize the role for a play; and more. It’s undeniably all over the place, but the thing is that it does each aspect pretty darn well and that the show wouldn’t have shown so much promise if it didn’t transcend the weekly mystery-solving antics of season one; in the end it’s only really at fault in how it organizes these segments. One particular scene I’d like to do a subtle close-reading of is the interaction between Ratio and Birthday at the end of the ninth episode in which Birthday quite literally starts spewing blood out of his mouth and all but falls out of commission; it’s as if the whole twenty minutes preluding the scene (pretty much the entire episode) was meant to emphasize the gravity of this situation by means of its own contrasting light-hearted debauchery with the rest of the rascals of Café Nowhere. This juxtaposition is of course one of the key examples of the show’s promise that is apparently only eligible subsequent to a rather questionable direction of focus. In contrast to this scene is the brawl scene at the end of the third episode, 「Madness Flower」; in what is quite possibly the most shounen moment of the year,  Nice is saved from Art’s final blow by first, Murasaki, second, Birthday, and third, Ratio, all of whom get their respective attacks dished out on Art, to much satisfaction (as some bonus parallel points, the street-fight setting is highly reminiscent of the recently concluded Yozakura Quartet: Hana no Uta.) It’s a celebratory occasion of the purest shounen nature, and I was even sitting on the edge of my seat questioning why the same fate couldn’t be bestowed upon another certain resemblant character of another certain resemblant series (boy, that would be a lot of attacks from a lot of characters). And for the most part, that scene in particular has its own standalone impact; it’s the concluding scene to an episode that is wholly focused on the prime narrative, and that overall structure delivers well. Such is not always the occasion for the series though, as when the show is especially centered on its grand narrative, the script introduces a lot of bases, though, again, it doesn’t quite fully cover them; so it’s not entirely shocking when antagonists are finally dealt with in the span of seconds in the form of a self-inflicted gunshot to the head in the last episode.

All in all, for a story of its caliber, Hamatora definitely incites some thrilling plot elements and plays off of the shock-factor well. To that extent, as aforementioned, it can hold its own against the run-of-the-mill shounen series; but while the shounen genre is undeniably the powerhouse of the anime (and manga)  industry, the medium itself is vast, brimming with both variety and potential, and ultimately transcendent of the peak of Hamatora‘s execution. Well, when it comes to judging the best of the best on a yearly basis, at least. By any other criteria, I can comfortably say, “Good show Hamatoragood show.”


Source: l3reezer.becauseofdreams.com
1 day ago41 notes#hamatora #re hamatora #re:_hamatora #re: hamatora #hamatora the animation #anime #reviews #review

2014-09-28



Source: insignificantinsect
Reblogged from optimusjayee ★ Originally posted by insignificantinsect
2 days ago1,096 notes#shin chan #crayon shin chan #anime

2014-09-28



Source: hauntedexams
Reblogged from rowdyimouto ★ Originally posted by hauntedexams
3 days ago2,906 notes#yu yu hakusho #yyh #anime #gif #animation

2014-09-28



Source: katakatakatakata
Reblogged from juuzou ★ Originally posted by katakatakatakata
3 days ago2,753 notes#he ded #hunter x hunter #hxh #anime #gif

2014-09-28



Source: coalgirls
Reblogged from cloudysmile ★ Originally posted by coalgirls
3 days ago4,759 notes#barakamon #anime #gif

2014-09-28


Source: worldofglass
Reblogged from animehenshin ★ Originally posted by worldofglass
3 days ago1,297 notes#i need to catch up ;) #i caught up on sao ii first thinking that it was one cour and was so disappoint that i marathond it just to NOT BE DONE WITH IT!! #aldnoah zero #aldnoah.zero #anime #gif

2014-09-28


Source: coalgirls
Reblogged from arrietties ★ Originally posted by coalgirls
3 days ago6,032 notes#the nidaime is a total bad ass #naruto #anime #gif #manga #animanga

2014-09-28

ドンキホーテ海賊団


Source: torikagoh
Reblogged from cuposhannon ★ Originally posted by torikagoh
3 days ago941 notes#One Piece #anime #gif

2014-09-27


テラフォーマーズ第1話 「00-01 THE ENCOUNTER 既知との遭遇」Terra Formars #01. 「00-01 THE ENCOUNTER Encounter with the Known」
Source Material: Manga series by Sasuga YuuStudio(s): LIDENFILMSDirector(s): Hamasaki Hiroshi (浜崎 博嗣)Script: Yasukawa Shogo (ヤスカワ ショウゴ)Music: Murai Shusei (村井 秀清)
Background Information:
Terra Formers is an original Japanese manga series written by Sasuga Yuu and illustrated by Tachibana Kenichi serialized in Shueisha‘s Weekly Young Jump magazine since 2011.  In 2013, it was nominated for the 6th Manga Taishō Award. It is currently ongoing, with an original video animation accompanying the television anime adaptation and a sping-off manga entitled Terra for Police serialized in the Jump Kai magazine.
Pre-premiere Synopsis:
In the 21st century, scientists tasked with terraforming Mars devised a cost-effective method of using mold to absorb sunlight on the surface of the planet and using cockroaches as a food source for the mold. In the year 2577, the process is all but complete, save the commencement of mankind’s settlement by means of sending its first manned crew to Mars to eliminate the roaches and pave the way for the rest of humanity’s migration. However, the six crew members sent to Mars discover that the cockroaches themselves have mutated into giant humanoid creatures with immense strength. Receiving a warning transmission from the crew members before they are annihilated, the rest of humanity begins a program to engineer elite warriors to exterminate the monsters humanity have created for the sake of its own survival.
Episode Synopsis:
After Hizamaru Akari is conned into participating in an underground cage-match for the entertainment of the rich, he realizes the shocking truth  that he is  ultimately powerless towards saving his childhood sweetheart and the love of his life, Yuriko, who is afflicted with an incurable, alien disease. He is recruited by Komachi Shoukichi and Michelle K. Davis to join the Terra Formers program under the pretense of finding a cure to the disease on Mars and saving the rest of humanity still alive and still fighting against the epidemic. Hizamaru succumbs to the mortal injuries he had incurred during his fight-to-the-death with a bear and wakes up one week later with the surgical operations necessary for anyone who intends to travel to Mars already performed and completed on him. While recuperating, he has brief encounters with other members of the Terra Formers program, including Marcos Eringrad Garcia, Eva Frost, and a couple of others. Each recruit hails from a different nation of the world and exhibit differing spirits, or lack thereof, about participating in the program; but before long, the time has come for the entire crew to depart for Mars, with the task of paving the way for humanity’s survival future.
Review:
A melodramatic exposition to start off the premiere of Terra Formars, but by the end of the episode, that momentum is used for quite the unexpected, yes, you heard her right, specialized and well-trained reservists blasting off into space to wage humanity’s war on… cockroaches…?! While it’s not quite terraforming by the conventional environmental sense of the word, fending off space cockroaches and finding a cure for an epidemic does still technically imply making an environment capable of supporting life; whether it makes for a compelling story or not is another question entirely, I’d say. While the premise is somewhat of a far cry from the much more forthright alien threat on humanity or necessity to abandon humanity’s current host planet, the base elements of sci-fi in Terra Formars are pretty much the same as you would find elsewhere. Already I’m taking note of the blanket science-fiction tropes such as the jealous rival who is so envious of the protagonist’s success during military training that he ends up sabotaging him in an actual scenario wherein humanity’s survival hinges on the success of the team, the leader figure who is only so learned because he was a part of a prior gruesome mission in which he was one of the only survivors, the unnerved girl who is bound to lose her sanity upon experiencing the death of those around her, and the like. Of course there’s also the complementary fantasy element to consider, which as of now, I can only interpret as some variant of vampirism (though since it seems to be scientifically-engineered, I guess we still are wholly in the realm of science fiction). And even though it’s explained that these mutant cockroaches are in fact the byproduct of a scientific endeavor, imagining protagonist Hizamaru face-off against them like he did that bear in the cage-match, it sure paints the picture of something much more fantastical than scientific-fictitious for me. As the premiere concludes with a paradigm shift from Hizamaru’s tragic back-story on Earth to the military expedition on Mars, now feels like the worst time to try to gauge an overall feel for the show. But at the same time, I’m inclined to think this is also a shift away from what was undoubtedly the most captivating thing about the premiere, a quite underhanded unraveling of pathos to firmly establish the protagonist’s archetype. It is kind of cheap I have to say, a back-story like that, but admittedly, it works. Whether the writing from here on out excessively relies on that one plot point to drive Hizamaru’s character or it builds upon it to continually develop his character will play a great role in this show possibly becoming more interesting than it has shown to be. Things will most likely delve into a more intense atmosphere as the newly recruited reservists engage in their life-or-death mission, which in a lot of ways in turn paves the way for better dramatic writing, if that’s this series’s cup of tea, that is. As of now, I’m mostly getting the feeling of less emotional disclosure and more unbridled, cockroach-punching action, which may turn out to be just what the space doctor ordered. The elements of the show that I can sufficiently review, those mainly being the production values, I have to say aren’t quite my own cup of tea. The art style is one that I’ve become disinterested with after viewing other such series as Zetman and Zettai Karen Children: The Unlimited – Hyoubu Kyousuke (it’s almost as if that hair-style on the protagonist is a prerequisite for shows like this). The character designs flaunt a robust definition in them as if the series were based off an American comic book rather than a Japanese manga, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing at all; but with base American names like Michelle K. Davis, there’s just an unrelenting interpretation of how uncreative the conception process might have been. The color palette is one that matches the illustrative style in its dark tones and dreary template, which is generally fine, but again, takes me back to the aforementioned series my eyes have grown weary of.  The animation by Studio LINDENFILMS is eye-catching in the opening scene with Hizamaru confronting  his ravenous bear opponent, but more of such animation being the only thing to look forward to visually may just not be enough in the long run. All in all, I’m interested to see how Terra Formars will mix together the qualities of action, science-fiction, and maybe even a little bit of horror, but the more crucial components of story-telling force me to be reserved in my general first impressions.
Rating: 7.9/10

テラフォーマーズ第1話 「00-01 THE ENCOUNTER 既知との遭遇」
Terra Formars #01. 「00-01 THE ENCOUNTER Encounter with the Known」

Source Material: Manga series by Sasuga Yuu
Studio(s): LIDENFILMS
Director(s): Hamasaki Hiroshi (浜崎 博嗣)
Script: Yasukawa Shogo (ヤスカワ ショウゴ)
Music: Murai Shusei (村井 秀清)

Background Information:

Terra Formers is an original Japanese manga series written by Sasuga Yuu and illustrated by Tachibana Kenichi serialized in Shueisha‘s Weekly Young Jump magazine since 2011.  In 2013, it was nominated for the 6th Manga Taishō Award. It is currently ongoing, with an original video animation accompanying the television anime adaptation and a sping-off manga entitled Terra for Police serialized in the Jump Kai magazine.

Pre-premiere Synopsis:

In the 21st century, scientists tasked with terraforming Mars devised a cost-effective method of using mold to absorb sunlight on the surface of the planet and using cockroaches as a food source for the mold. In the year 2577, the process is all but complete, save the commencement of mankind’s settlement by means of sending its first manned crew to Mars to eliminate the roaches and pave the way for the rest of humanity’s migration. However, the six crew members sent to Mars discover that the cockroaches themselves have mutated into giant humanoid creatures with immense strength. Receiving a warning transmission from the crew members before they are annihilated, the rest of humanity begins a program to engineer elite warriors to exterminate the monsters humanity have created for the sake of its own survival.

Episode Synopsis:

After Hizamaru Akari is conned into participating in an underground cage-match for the entertainment of the rich, he realizes the shocking truth  that he is  ultimately powerless towards saving his childhood sweetheart and the love of his life, Yuriko, who is afflicted with an incurable, alien disease. He is recruited by Komachi Shoukichi and Michelle K. Davis to join the Terra Formers program under the pretense of finding a cure to the disease on Mars and saving the rest of humanity still alive and still fighting against the epidemic. Hizamaru succumbs to the mortal injuries he had incurred during his fight-to-the-death with a bear and wakes up one week later with the surgical operations necessary for anyone who intends to travel to Mars already performed and completed on him. While recuperating, he has brief encounters with other members of the Terra Formers program, including Marcos Eringrad Garcia, Eva Frost, and a couple of others. Each recruit hails from a different nation of the world and exhibit differing spirits, or lack thereof, about participating in the program; but before long, the time has come for the entire crew to depart for Mars, with the task of paving the way for humanity’s survival future.

Review:

A melodramatic exposition to start off the premiere of Terra Formars, but by the end of the episode, that momentum is used for quite the unexpected, yes, you heard her right, specialized and well-trained reservists blasting off into space to wage humanity’s war on… cockroaches…?! While it’s not quite terraforming by the conventional environmental sense of the word, fending off space cockroaches and finding a cure for an epidemic does still technically imply making an environment capable of supporting life; whether it makes for a compelling story or not is another question entirely, I’d say. While the premise is somewhat of a far cry from the much more forthright alien threat on humanity or necessity to abandon humanity’s current host planet, the base elements of sci-fi in Terra Formars are pretty much the same as you would find elsewhere. Already I’m taking note of the blanket science-fiction tropes such as the jealous rival who is so envious of the protagonist’s success during military training that he ends up sabotaging him in an actual scenario wherein humanity’s survival hinges on the success of the team, the leader figure who is only so learned because he was a part of a prior gruesome mission in which he was one of the only survivors, the unnerved girl who is bound to lose her sanity upon experiencing the death of those around her, and the like. Of course there’s also the complementary fantasy element to consider, which as of now, I can only interpret as some variant of vampirism (though since it seems to be scientifically-engineered, I guess we still are wholly in the realm of science fiction). And even though it’s explained that these mutant cockroaches are in fact the byproduct of a scientific endeavor, imagining protagonist Hizamaru face-off against them like he did that bear in the cage-match, it sure paints the picture of something much more fantastical than scientific-fictitious for me. As the premiere concludes with a paradigm shift from Hizamaru’s tragic back-story on Earth to the military expedition on Mars, now feels like the worst time to try to gauge an overall feel for the show. But at the same time, I’m inclined to think this is also a shift away from what was undoubtedly the most captivating thing about the premiere, a quite underhanded unraveling of pathos to firmly establish the protagonist’s archetype. It is kind of cheap I have to say, a back-story like that, but admittedly, it works. Whether the writing from here on out excessively relies on that one plot point to drive Hizamaru’s character or it builds upon it to continually develop his character will play a great role in this show possibly becoming more interesting than it has shown to be. Things will most likely delve into a more intense atmosphere as the newly recruited reservists engage in their life-or-death mission, which in a lot of ways in turn paves the way for better dramatic writing, if that’s this series’s cup of tea, that is. As of now, I’m mostly getting the feeling of less emotional disclosure and more unbridled, cockroach-punching action, which may turn out to be just what the space doctor ordered. The elements of the show that I can sufficiently review, those mainly being the production values, I have to say aren’t quite my own cup of tea. The art style is one that I’ve become disinterested with after viewing other such series as Zetman and Zettai Karen Children: The Unlimited – Hyoubu Kyousuke (it’s almost as if that hair-style on the protagonist is a prerequisite for shows like this). The character designs flaunt a robust definition in them as if the series were based off an American comic book rather than a Japanese manga, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing at all; but with base American names like Michelle K. Davis, there’s just an unrelenting interpretation of how uncreative the conception process might have been. The color palette is one that matches the illustrative style in its dark tones and dreary template, which is generally fine, but again, takes me back to the aforementioned series my eyes have grown weary of.  The animation by Studio LINDENFILMS is eye-catching in the opening scene with Hizamaru confronting  his ravenous bear opponent, but more of such animation being the only thing to look forward to visually may just not be enough in the long run. All in all, I’m interested to see how Terra Formars will mix together the qualities of action, science-fiction, and maybe even a little bit of horror, but the more crucial components of story-telling force me to be reserved in my general first impressions.

Rating: 7.9/10


Source: l3reezer.becauseofdreams.com
3 days ago11 notes#terra formars #review #reviews #anime #fall 2014 #anime premieres #LIDENFILMS #テラフォーマーズ #the encounter #Sasuga Yuu

2014-09-26

Haikyuu!! + some in-series titles


Source: bokuto
Reblogged from ryuuichi-san ★ Originally posted by bokuto
4 days ago2,788 notes#haikyuu!! #haikyuu #anime #gif

2014-09-26

luckgaki00:

ONE PIECE 3D2Y
原画 key animation
http://tmblr.co/ZTWPMn1PvRJ_Z http://tmblr.co/ZTWPMn1PvRHxE http://tmblr.co/ZTWPMn1Ptv9pG

luckgaki00:

ONE PIECE 3D2Y

原画 key animation

http://tmblr.co/ZTWPMn1PvRJ_Z
http://tmblr.co/ZTWPMn1PvRHxE
http://tmblr.co/ZTWPMn1Ptv9pG


Reblogged from luckgaki00 ★ Originally posted by luckgaki00
5 days ago199 notes#links to my gifs *V* #ONE PIECE #animation #anime #gif
左の列
(≚ᄌ≚)ℒℴѵℯ❤