A.K.A. Buy my shit because I'm poor and still need to deplete this first batch that I spent hundreds of my own dollars on!!

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2014-04-17

just saw Onoda on the tumblr front page, hrueheurheurhr


29 minutes ago3 notes

2014-04-17

Hatsune x Gaga, what a world


1 hour ago1 note

2014-04-17

swankydanks replied to your post: ご注文はうさぎですか? 第1話 「ひと目で、尋常でないもふもふだと見抜いたよ…

Love how in depth you go in for reviews. Makes me wish I was better at writing

Thanks for reading and noticing! Though I’m nowhere near the level of the blogger(s)/reviewer(s) I admire; you’ll always pale in comparison to something. If you want to get better, nothing to it but to do it


2 hours ago#swankydanks #responses

2014-04-17

シドニアの騎士 第1話「初陣」 Sidonia no Kishi #01. 「First Battle」
Source Material: Manga series by Tsutomu Nihei (弐瓶 勉)Studio(s): Polygon PicturesDirector(s): Kobun Shizuno (静野 孔文)Writer(s):  Sadayuki Murai (村井 さだゆき)
Background Information:
Knights of Sidonia is a manga series by Tsutomu Nihei, published in Kondansha’s Monthly Afternoon seinen manga magazine since April 2009. In North America, the English localization is published by the Japanese novel and manga company, Vertical, headquartered in New York, United States.
Synopsis:
One thousand years after the invasion of the Gauna, a mysterious alien race with no method of communication that destroyed the solar system, the remains of humanity live on enormous “seed ships” drifting through space. On one of these seed ships, Sidonia, Nagate Tanikaze was raised deep within the confines, never seeing what he simply knows as “the surface.” When his grandfather, the last family member he was living with, dies, a starving Nagate attempts to steal rice from a production facility. After an extended struggle, Nagate is ultimately caught by authorities and adopted by a mysterious woman under the condition that he enrolls into institution and trains to become a Gardes pilot, knights of advanced space-crafts meant to explore new spatial territories for humanity and more importantly to lead future conflicts against the Gauna. Nagate’s new mother is aware of some unrevealed potential within him and as an authority of Sidonia, sends him out to sortie on his first day of enrollment. Additionally, he is granted usage of Tsugumori, one of the twenty-eight special spears meant to combat the Gauna. The mission is meant to be a rather simple expedition but the crew is suddenly ambushed by Gauna , sparking Nagate’s involvement in humanity’s war against the fearsome species.
Review:
If you’re anything like me, then you believe that there can be art in anything. Fortunately, by nature that includes computer-generated imagery, something that, at this point, has essentially become a stigma in global media, whether that be live-action Hollywood movies or traditionally hand-drawn animation. But with series like Knights of Sidonia, a show that just screams high-reaching ambition from the moment it’s green-lit, there may be a chance for the Japanese staple of animation to eventually match the works of the Western powerhouse studios like Pixar Animation and DreamWorks. In no way am I saying Sidonia will be the decisive call to engage in the frontier of the third dimension (plenty of Japanese works, such as Oblivion Island, Advent Children, and Appleseed, have after all made the news-waves in that manner already), but there’s a lot to be admired about its production method in flipping the ratio of 2D to 3D, when the industry standard is, for the most part, settling for 3D when the animation budget falls flat. (I’d also like to note that together, Stardust Crusaders and Sidonia’s 3D openings are giving the rest of this season’s series a pretty good run for their money, literally.) I have no doubt that a lot of viewers imagined how much better the show would’ve looked had it been done in the traditional hand-drawn anime style, and I don’t blame them at all, really. It’s something I admittedly thought about constantly for the first five minutes or so, until eventually a realization occurred to me. Whether intentional or not, the immediate uncanny valley reaction actually seems like the perfect fit for the unearthly, dystopian world portrayed in the story, a perdurable imagery that the eerie soundtrack, despondent color palette, and mask-wearing, gender-absent, identical characters additionally accentuate to shuddersome degrees. It really does feel like a filmic production, Sidonia, each shot seemingly thoroughly planned from the beginning, an impression I mostly associate with the intricate camera  angles that overlay this incessant feeling of desolation through the emptiness of vast, spacious areas only inhibited by one character. For a science-fiction genre story situated on an inter-racial war, Sidonia rehashes some pretty familiar tropes. The destined protagonist who starkly contrasts the new age of genetically-engineered humans and who is, without warning, enrolled into a prestigious academy that trains elite fighter-pilots just to prove he can become the ace student (and pilot) within weeks, or even days. The rival who should be a convivial student and comrade but ultimately succumbs to extreme jealousy at the capacity of the protagonist and the special treatment he receives from the top brass of the military in charge of the training academy. The girl, or girls in this case, who are first to befriend the protagonist, when it’s essentially him against the world, and enable him the confidence to display resounding leadership and win over the rest of his comrades. And then the authoritative figure who forces the protagonist into the hero role with tough love that will always teeter more on the side of coldhearted-ness but will nonetheless always retain the ambiguity of true affection. Oh, and I guess of course there’s also the snarling alien race portrayed as a relentless and imminent threat to humanity. That’s kind of a given, so I’m not sure to what degree that could be considered a generic, but I do think the Gauna are worth noting particularly because of the official series summary that describes them as an alien species with “no known method of communication.” More often than not, the protagonist isn’t  declared special only in his mental or physical capacity, but also his emotional connectivity, so super-powered that he is the only hope in communicating and bringing peace with the alien force initially painted as monstrous, inhumane, and wholly incompatible. Noticing Sidonia’s depth in establishing how different a kind this future humankind is, my mind is open to all the directions this show could possibly head. For the time being, it has done more than enough to make the case that it’s quite the introspective feature. Right now, the most of my worries is its planned twelve episode runtime (which is more understandable considering Polygon Pictures being a wholly new animation studio); but as I’ve said before, when something like that is the most of your worries, you’re pretty well off already.
Rating: 8.5/10

シドニアの騎士 1初陣」
Sidonia no Kishi #01. First Battle

Source Material: Manga series by Tsutomu Nihei (弐瓶 勉)
Studio(s): Polygon Pictures
Director(s): Kobun Shizuno (静野 孔文)
Writer(s):  Sadayuki Murai (村井 さだゆき)

Background Information:

Knights of Sidonia is a manga series by Tsutomu Nihei, published in Kondansha’s Monthly Afternoon seinen manga magazine since April 2009. In North America, the English localization is published by the Japanese novel and manga company, Vertical, headquartered in New York, United States.

Synopsis:

One thousand years after the invasion of the Gauna, a mysterious alien race with no method of communication that destroyed the solar system, the remains of humanity live on enormous “seed ships” drifting through space. On one of these seed ships, Sidonia, Nagate Tanikaze was raised deep within the confines, never seeing what he simply knows as “the surface.” When his grandfather, the last family member he was living with, dies, a starving Nagate attempts to steal rice from a production facility. After an extended struggle, Nagate is ultimately caught by authorities and adopted by a mysterious woman under the condition that he enrolls into institution and trains to become a Gardes pilot, knights of advanced space-crafts meant to explore new spatial territories for humanity and more importantly to lead future conflicts against the Gauna. Nagate’s new mother is aware of some unrevealed potential within him and as an authority of Sidonia, sends him out to sortie on his first day of enrollment. Additionally, he is granted usage of Tsugumori, one of the twenty-eight special spears meant to combat the Gauna. The mission is meant to be a rather simple expedition but the crew is suddenly ambushed by Gauna , sparking Nagate’s involvement in humanity’s war against the fearsome species.

Review:

If you’re anything like me, then you believe that there can be art in anything. Fortunately, by nature that includes computer-generated imagery, something that, at this point, has essentially become a stigma in global media, whether that be live-action Hollywood movies or traditionally hand-drawn animation. But with series like Knights of Sidonia, a show that just screams high-reaching ambition from the moment it’s green-lit, there may be a chance for the Japanese staple of animation to eventually match the works of the Western powerhouse studios like Pixar Animation and DreamWorks. In no way am I saying Sidonia will be the decisive call to engage in the frontier of the third dimension (plenty of Japanese works, such as Oblivion Island, Advent Children, and Appleseed, have after all made the news-waves in that manner already), but there’s a lot to be admired about its production method in flipping the ratio of 2D to 3D, when the industry standard is, for the most part, settling for 3D when the animation budget falls flat. (I’d also like to note that together, Stardust Crusaders and Sidonia’s 3D openings are giving the rest of this season’s series a pretty good run for their money, literally.) I have no doubt that a lot of viewers imagined how much better the show would’ve looked had it been done in the traditional hand-drawn anime style, and I don’t blame them at all, really. It’s something I admittedly thought about constantly for the first five minutes or so, until eventually a realization occurred to me. Whether intentional or not, the immediate uncanny valley reaction actually seems like the perfect fit for the unearthly, dystopian world portrayed in the story, a perdurable imagery that the eerie soundtrack, despondent color palette, and mask-wearing, gender-absent, identical characters additionally accentuate to shuddersome degrees. It really does feel like a filmic production, Sidonia, each shot seemingly thoroughly planned from the beginning, an impression I mostly associate with the intricate camera  angles that overlay this incessant feeling of desolation through the emptiness of vast, spacious areas only inhibited by one character. For a science-fiction genre story situated on an inter-racial war, Sidonia rehashes some pretty familiar tropes. The destined protagonist who starkly contrasts the new age of genetically-engineered humans and who is, without warning, enrolled into a prestigious academy that trains elite fighter-pilots just to prove he can become the ace student (and pilot) within weeks, or even days. The rival who should be a convivial student and comrade but ultimately succumbs to extreme jealousy at the capacity of the protagonist and the special treatment he receives from the top brass of the military in charge of the training academy. The girl, or girls in this case, who are first to befriend the protagonist, when it’s essentially him against the world, and enable him the confidence to display resounding leadership and win over the rest of his comrades. And then the authoritative figure who forces the protagonist into the hero role with tough love that will always teeter more on the side of coldhearted-ness but will nonetheless always retain the ambiguity of true affection. Oh, and I guess of course there’s also the snarling alien race portrayed as a relentless and imminent threat to humanity. That’s kind of a given, so I’m not sure to what degree that could be considered a generic, but I do think the Gauna are worth noting particularly because of the official series summary that describes them as an alien species with “no known method of communication.” More often than not, the protagonist isn’t  declared special only in his mental or physical capacity, but also his emotional connectivity, so super-powered that he is the only hope in communicating and bringing peace with the alien force initially painted as monstrous, inhumane, and wholly incompatible. Noticing Sidonia’s depth in establishing how different a kind this future humankind is, my mind is open to all the directions this show could possibly head. For the time being, it has done more than enough to make the case that it’s quite the introspective feature. Right now, the most of my worries is its planned twelve episode runtime (which is more understandable considering Polygon Pictures being a wholly new animation studio); but as I’ve said before, when something like that is the most of your worries, you’re pretty well off already.

Rating: 8.5/10


Source: l3reezer.becauseofdreams.com
2 hours ago8 notes#knights of sidonia #sidonia no kishi #anime #premieres #review #spring anime season #spring anime premiere

2014-04-16

ご注文はうさぎですか? 第1話 「ひと目で、尋常でないもふもふだと見抜いたよ」 Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?#01. 「I Knew at First Glance That It Was No Ordinary Fluffball」
Source Material: 4-koma manga series by KoiStudio(s): White FoxDirector(s): Hiroyuki Hashimoto (橋本 裕之)Writer(s):  Kazuyuki Fudeyasu (筆安 一幸)
Background Information:
Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? is a 4-koma comedy manga series by Koi, serialized in Houbunsha’s seinen manga magazine Manga Time Kirara Max from March 2011 and onwards. As of March 2014, the series has been collected into three tankoubon volumes.
Synopsis:
Hoto Kokoa has just moved into a new town to attend school. Upon arrival, she gets lost and comes across the Rabbit House, a café by day, a bar by night and a residence all throughout. Without knowing the Rabbit House is actually her new home, Kokoa enters to see the rabbits. She is initially disappointed when she finds Chino Kafuu, granddaughter of Rabbit House’s owner, instead of actual rabbits but rejoices when she finds out Chino is also her new housemate. Kokoa prompts Chino to call her “big sister” and also orders three cups of coffee so that she can cuddle with the suppositious rabbit on Chino’s head, that is actually a rabbit, that is actually Chino’s grandfather in the form of a rabbit, unbeknownst to Kokoa. Kokoa starts working at the Rabbit House to compensate her tenancy and meets Lize Tedeza, a part-timer at the café with a powerful physique and a handy-dandy fire-arm kept for “self-defense” purposes. Together, the three girls spend a day holding down the café fort, checking inventory, cleaning, handling customers, making latte art, and becoming closers co-workers. In the evening, together Kokoa and Chino eat stew for dinner, take a bath, and prepare for sleep. Kokoa reflects that this new town to her is a wonderful place, a remark met by Chino’s content. Meanwhile, downstairs in the bar, Chino’s father and grandfather agree that Kokoa will have an endearing influence on Chino.
Review: 
That was a really wonderful example of scenic illustrations exquisitely building upon the overall atmosphere of the show. I’m really impressed with Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?’s approach in this first episode; there’s no urgency whatsoever to instantly lure viewers in with a thrilling backstory for the lead character or any other such exposition-establishing material. Instead it’s just great art and heart-warming character interactions from the start, truly a genuine presentation that gives you the rightful response of, “this is pretty darn cute,” or surely something in that manner.  I’ve recently noticed that I’m a lot more inclined to gravitate towards shows with an all-female cast when the set-up and their relationships aren’t just the run-of-the-mill schoolmate exchanges. I do say that with a grain of salt though, seeing as how the next week’s preview has our lead character, Kokoa, starting school in her new hometown and probably engaging in just those kinds of activities. If that be the case, we’ll always have the first episode, I suppose. But generally speaking, from the past with series like So Ra No Wo To to now with Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? , because they’re set in a more suitably-fictional world outside the school classroom, there seems to be a lot more chance to break out of the tiresome female archetypes, in character and in plot. That’s not to say that Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? doesn’t have its overt character tropes though; in fact, I think this episode spells out a double-tsundere complex with Chino and Lize both denying Kokoa’s lovely amiability. Nevertheless, something about the scenario in general, whether it be the Rabbit House café as a locale or the caffeinated coffee motif, that demands this overdone interplay be seen through a fresh, energized lens. In commending Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?, I think there’s a necessary amount of praise to be directed to the production studio at work here, White Fox. Given the scale and structure of 4-koma manga series, I can’t image that original series creator, Koi, is illustrating these spectacular views in the background of the panels (though all power to him or her if he or she actually is). I can’t stress enough (with a cup of coffee in hand) how much the illustrated backdrops are doing it for me. This is quite actually the kind of atmosphere I would want to indulge in when going to a legitimate café to absorb and transition its aesthetic atmosphere into creative fuel. And here, White Fox has done the altruistic thing and compiled these sentiments into a twenty minute video file, what is there not to be thankful for? At this point, while Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? hasn’t really addressed a clear plotline to follow, I think the closing scene with Chino’s father and grandfather sum up what the series is to be quite finely. For series like these, the characters always are at center-stage, demonstrating what the true essence of the show is. So far, Kokoa has had an adorable effect on both Chino and Lize, and I’m so sold already that I would be perfectly content if the main cast didn’t extend one bit more. All in all, it’s a superb performing going on so far and I don’t think it’s prone to letting down as it continues down the road.
Rating: 8.7/10

ご注文はうさぎですか? 第1話 「ひと目で、尋常でないもふもふだと見抜いたよ」
Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?#01. 「I Knew at First Glance That It Was No Ordinary Fluffball」

Source Material: 4-koma manga series by Koi
Studio(s): White Fox
Director(s): Hiroyuki Hashimoto (橋本 裕之)
Writer(s):  Kazuyuki Fudeyasu (筆安 一幸)

Background Information:

Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? is a 4-koma comedy manga series by Koi, serialized in Houbunsha’s seinen manga magazine Manga Time Kirara Max from March 2011 and onwards. As of March 2014, the series has been collected into three tankoubon volumes.

Synopsis:

Hoto Kokoa has just moved into a new town to attend school. Upon arrival, she gets lost and comes across the Rabbit House, a café by day, a bar by night and a residence all throughout. Without knowing the Rabbit House is actually her new home, Kokoa enters to see the rabbits. She is initially disappointed when she finds Chino Kafuu, granddaughter of Rabbit House’s owner, instead of actual rabbits but rejoices when she finds out Chino is also her new housemate. Kokoa prompts Chino to call her “big sister” and also orders three cups of coffee so that she can cuddle with the suppositious rabbit on Chino’s head, that is actually a rabbit, that is actually Chino’s grandfather in the form of a rabbit, unbeknownst to Kokoa. Kokoa starts working at the Rabbit House to compensate her tenancy and meets Lize Tedeza, a part-timer at the café with a powerful physique and a handy-dandy fire-arm kept for “self-defense” purposes. Together, the three girls spend a day holding down the café fort, checking inventory, cleaning, handling customers, making latte art, and becoming closers co-workers. In the evening, together Kokoa and Chino eat stew for dinner, take a bath, and prepare for sleep. Kokoa reflects that this new town to her is a wonderful place, a remark met by Chino’s content. Meanwhile, downstairs in the bar, Chino’s father and grandfather agree that Kokoa will have an endearing influence on Chino.

Review:

That was a really wonderful example of scenic illustrations exquisitely building upon the overall atmosphere of the show. I’m really impressed with Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?’s approach in this first episode; there’s no urgency whatsoever to instantly lure viewers in with a thrilling backstory for the lead character or any other such exposition-establishing material. Instead it’s just great art and heart-warming character interactions from the start, truly a genuine presentation that gives you the rightful response of, “this is pretty darn cute,” or surely something in that manner.  I’ve recently noticed that I’m a lot more inclined to gravitate towards shows with an all-female cast when the set-up and their relationships aren’t just the run-of-the-mill schoolmate exchanges. I do say that with a grain of salt though, seeing as how the next week’s preview has our lead character, Kokoa, starting school in her new hometown and probably engaging in just those kinds of activities. If that be the case, we’ll always have the first episode, I suppose. But generally speaking, from the past with series like So Ra No Wo To to now with Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? , because they’re set in a more suitably-fictional world outside the school classroom, there seems to be a lot more chance to break out of the tiresome female archetypes, in character and in plot. That’s not to say that Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? doesn’t have its overt character tropes though; in fact, I think this episode spells out a double-tsundere complex with Chino and Lize both denying Kokoa’s lovely amiability. Nevertheless, something about the scenario in general, whether it be the Rabbit House café as a locale or the caffeinated coffee motif, that demands this overdone interplay be seen through a fresh, energized lens. In commending Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?, I think there’s a necessary amount of praise to be directed to the production studio at work here, White Fox. Given the scale and structure of 4-koma manga series, I can’t image that original series creator, Koi, is illustrating these spectacular views in the background of the panels (though all power to him or her if he or she actually is). I can’t stress enough (with a cup of coffee in hand) how much the illustrated backdrops are doing it for me. This is quite actually the kind of atmosphere I would want to indulge in when going to a legitimate café to absorb and transition its aesthetic atmosphere into creative fuel. And here, White Fox has done the altruistic thing and compiled these sentiments into a twenty minute video file, what is there not to be thankful for? At this point, while Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? hasn’t really addressed a clear plotline to follow, I think the closing scene with Chino’s father and grandfather sum up what the series is to be quite finely. For series like these, the characters always are at center-stage, demonstrating what the true essence of the show is. So far, Kokoa has had an adorable effect on both Chino and Lize, and I’m so sold already that I would be perfectly content if the main cast didn’t extend one bit more. All in all, it’s a superb performing going on so far and I don’t think it’s prone to letting down as it continues down the road.

Rating: 8.7/10


Source: l3reezer.becauseofdreams.com
3 hours ago8 notes#Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka? #Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka #anime #review #premieres #spring anime season #spring anime premiere

2014-04-16


3 hours ago12 notes#Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?

2014-04-16


5 hours ago6 notes#Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?

2014-04-16


5 hours ago16 notes#Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?

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5 hours ago10 notes#Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?

2014-04-16

 

 


5 hours ago3 notes#Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?

2014-04-16


5 hours ago12 notes#Gochuumon wa Usagi Desuka?

2014-04-16

風雲維新ダイ☆ショーグン 第1話 「世継ぎ騒乱、慶一郎登場!」 Fuuun Ishin Dai☆Shogun #01. 「Succession Mayhem, Keiichirou Appears!」
Source Material: Original seriesStudio(s): J.C Staff, ACGTDirector(s): Takeshi Watanabe (渡部 高志)Writer(s):  Dai Satou (佐藤 大)
Background Information:
Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun is an original series by studios J.C. Staff and ACGT, headed by director Watanabe Takashi and series composer Dai Satou.
Synopsis:
Tokugawa Keiichirou is a descendent to the ruling Tokugawa shogunate, but since birth he has been raised by the elderly Otomi, owner of one of the best bathhouses in Nagasaki. A natural brute, Keiichirou has spent his young adult life getting into fights and inadvertently uniting Nagasaki under one leader, himself. When he finally has no one left who opposes him, he gets mixed up in the mysterious case of the sex-house murderer, the culprit a woman dressed in a red kimono who seduces and stabs seventeen-year old males to death. After being false accused himself, confronting a fearsome female ninja, and discovering the murder of one of his own underlings, Keeichirou is finally attacked himself by the culprit, a female assailant who was hunting him the whole time. By news of the aforementioned female ninja, Kiriko Hattori, and his grandmother, Keiichirou discovers that the Tokugawa shogunate is being overthrown and that he is a rightful inheritor of the Tokugawa bloodline. He is taken to the inner chambers of the bathhouse to witness the rise of a giant robot called Onigami, an ancient machine that can only be piloted by a true virgin of the Tokugawa bloodline, a condition that points all fingers at none other than Keiichirou.
Review:
I swear, I haven’t seen that many lens flares since my last viewing of Star Trek Into Darkness. Oddly enough, as with J.J. Abrams’s take on the rebooted series, they gave Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun a certain visual touch that made it shine on-screen a bit more, figuratively and literally. It’s been a while since my last historical adaptation, Oda Nobuna no Yabou back in 2012, if I remember correctly. And while I’ve taken some courses in Japanese history and culture within that time-frame, I don’t think I’m in any position still to gauge this, or any other, show’s historical accuracy. But for the most part, it doesn’t seem like that’s going to be a necessity because this series is a bastardization of Japanese history in the whole sense of the word. Anachronistic technology, gender-bending, over-stylized personalities, and… all those lens flares…  I just can’t help but to reiterate their presence. The story takes place in an alternate Japan in which the Meiji Restoration of 1868 never happened. Instead, with the use of giant robots to drive away foreign ships, Japan remained isolated from the rest of the world, and remained in the relatively primitive Edo period, where people don’t even have baths in their own homes, . But what they do have is giant robots. Imagine that. So it’s obviously nonsensical, everything here so far, but there’s something about the way Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougunpresents itself that gives the impression that it has fully accepted itself as a ridiculous story, so much so, that’s it’s almost admirable how much fun it’s making out of itself. It’s kind of amazing, actually, considering the role of Dai Satou, a man with whollyaccomplished works under his belt (Cowboy Bebop, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Wolf’s Rain, Samurai Champloo, Eureka Seven, Ergo Proxy, Toward the Terra, Eden of the East, Lupin the Third: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine, etc), the man who has been quoted saying he only works on series with “meaningful stories”, as series composer. A premiere episode of gratuitous boobage, homoerotic jokes, and ninja grannies is a far cry from those of the aforementioned series, to say the least. But it’s not all for naught. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but something about Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun gives it a certain oomph that prevents me from writing it off as a hapless train-wreck as I did with last season’s Nobunaga the Fool, or any other resembling predecessors. What’s even more inexplicable is that, in comparing to Nobunaga the Fool, the main cast of both series essentially share the exact same archetypes, the zealous, easy-going protagonist fated to be a ruler, the pervert of a best friend, and the well-rounded heroine come to guide the hero to his fate. Yet one completely triumphs over the other in delivery and has me much more attached to the characters. How? I don’t know. Maybe it’s the lens flares… In any case, I think I’ll allot the achievement to the series composer, as I imagine script-writing to be one of the core components of a show that often gets overlooked when it actually does provide for a lot of direct and indirect impressions. And in giving Dai Satou the benefit of the doubt, since I’ve never really disliked anything to come from his creative mind, I’m also going to place my bets on what’s to come. Seeing as how Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun is perfectly enjoyable right now, it developing into a grander story is just what it needs to bring it up to the next level of entertainment. And if that doesn’t happen, I’m more than willing to give it a few more episodes at this point just to find out why I’m so lenient towards it.
Rating: 8.3/10

風雲維新ダイ☆ショーグン 第1話 「世継ぎ騒乱、慶一郎登場!」
Fuuun Ishin Dai☆Shogun #01. 「Succession Mayhem, Keiichirou Appears!

Source Material: Original series
Studio(s): J.C Staff, ACGT
Director(s): Takeshi Watanabe (渡部 高志)
Writer(s):  Dai Satou (佐藤 大)

Background Information:

Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun is an original series by studios J.C. Staff and ACGT, headed by director Watanabe Takashi and series composer Dai Satou.

Synopsis:

Tokugawa Keiichirou is a descendent to the ruling Tokugawa shogunate, but since birth he has been raised by the elderly Otomi, owner of one of the best bathhouses in Nagasaki. A natural brute, Keiichirou has spent his young adult life getting into fights and inadvertently uniting Nagasaki under one leader, himself. When he finally has no one left who opposes him, he gets mixed up in the mysterious case of the sex-house murderer, the culprit a woman dressed in a red kimono who seduces and stabs seventeen-year old males to death. After being false accused himself, confronting a fearsome female ninja, and discovering the murder of one of his own underlings, Keeichirou is finally attacked himself by the culprit, a female assailant who was hunting him the whole time. By news of the aforementioned female ninja, Kiriko Hattori, and his grandmother, Keiichirou discovers that the Tokugawa shogunate is being overthrown and that he is a rightful inheritor of the Tokugawa bloodline. He is taken to the inner chambers of the bathhouse to witness the rise of a giant robot called Onigami, an ancient machine that can only be piloted by a true virgin of the Tokugawa bloodline, a condition that points all fingers at none other than Keiichirou.

Review:

I swear, I haven’t seen that many lens flares since my last viewing of Star Trek Into Darkness. Oddly enough, as with J.J. Abrams’s take on the rebooted series, they gave Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun a certain visual touch that made it shine on-screen a bit more, figuratively and literally. It’s been a while since my last historical adaptation, Oda Nobuna no Yabou back in 2012, if I remember correctly. And while I’ve taken some courses in Japanese history and culture within that time-frame, I don’t think I’m in any position still to gauge this, or any other, show’s historical accuracy. But for the most part, it doesn’t seem like that’s going to be a necessity because this series is a bastardization of Japanese history in the whole sense of the word. Anachronistic technology, gender-bending, over-stylized personalities, and… all those lens flares…  I just can’t help but to reiterate their presence. The story takes place in an alternate Japan in which the Meiji Restoration of 1868 never happened. Instead, with the use of giant robots to drive away foreign ships, Japan remained isolated from the rest of the world, and remained in the relatively primitive Edo period, where people don’t even have baths in their own homes, . But what they do have is giant robots. Imagine that. So it’s obviously nonsensical, everything here so far, but there’s something about the way Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougunpresents itself that gives the impression that it has fully accepted itself as a ridiculous story, so much so, that’s it’s almost admirable how much fun it’s making out of itself. It’s kind of amazing, actually, considering the role of Dai Satou, a man with whollyaccomplished works under his belt (Cowboy Bebop, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Wolf’s Rain, Samurai Champloo, Eureka Seven, Ergo Proxy, Toward the Terra, Eden of the East, Lupin the Third: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine, etc), the man who has been quoted saying he only works on series with “meaningful stories”, as series composer. A premiere episode of gratuitous boobage, homoerotic jokes, and ninja grannies is a far cry from those of the aforementioned series, to say the least. But it’s not all for naught. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but something about Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun gives it a certain oomph that prevents me from writing it off as a hapless train-wreck as I did with last season’s Nobunaga the Fool, or any other resembling predecessors. What’s even more inexplicable is that, in comparing to Nobunaga the Fool, the main cast of both series essentially share the exact same archetypes, the zealous, easy-going protagonist fated to be a ruler, the pervert of a best friend, and the well-rounded heroine come to guide the hero to his fate. Yet one completely triumphs over the other in delivery and has me much more attached to the characters. How? I don’t know. Maybe it’s the lens flares… In any case, I think I’ll allot the achievement to the series composer, as I imagine script-writing to be one of the core components of a show that often gets overlooked when it actually does provide for a lot of direct and indirect impressions. And in giving Dai Satou the benefit of the doubt, since I’ve never really disliked anything to come from his creative mind, I’m also going to place my bets on what’s to come. Seeing as how Fuuun Ishin Dai Shougun is perfectly enjoyable right now, it developing into a grander story is just what it needs to bring it up to the next level of entertainment. And if that doesn’t happen, I’m more than willing to give it a few more episodes at this point just to find out why I’m so lenient towards it.

Rating: 8.3/10


Source: l3reezer.becauseofdreams.com
5 hours ago#Fuuun Ishin Dai Shogun #Fuuun Ishin Dai☆Shogun #anime #premieres #review #spring anime season #spring anime premiere

2014-04-16


Reblogged from melonmilkie ★ Originally posted by prophetjohn-deactivated20130502
6 hours ago17,678 notes#photo #locale

2014-04-16


Source: sushiobunny
Reblogged from simpleandclean ★ Originally posted by sushiobunny
6 hours ago219 notes#kill la kill #animanga #fan art #pixiv

2014-04-16


8 hours ago3 notes#Hitsugi no Chaika

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